Natural medicine

12 uses for Mint leaves

How do you use extra mint leaves? Here are 12 marvelous uses for mint around the home and garden—from culinary to medicinal to mouthwash to bug repellent!

What do you know about the mint family, Lamiaceae, the sixth- or seventh-largest of the flowering plant families?

The most common and popular mints for growing are peppermint ( Mentha piperita), native spearmint ( Mentha spicata), Scotch spearmint ( Mentha gracilis), and cornmint ( Mentha arvensis); also (more recently) apple mint ( Mentha suaveolens).

Mint provides most of our common culinary herbs (e.g., basil, oregano, marjoram, rosemary, sage, thyme, summer and winter savories).

Plus, there are dozens (perhaps hundreds) of traditional medicinal herbs, not to mention many aromatics for use in flavorings, perfumes, and cosmetics.

You’ll also find mints among our favorite landscaping plants. Think salvias, agastaches, and lavenders, bee-balms, hyssop, and Russian sage. All summer, they produce nectar-rich blossoms, which attract bees and beneficial pollinators along with an occasional hummingbird. 

A favorite in my summer herb garden is the bright red bee-balm which seeds itself all over the place, makes a great cut flower, and serves as a tasty tea to boot.

Many, if not most mint-family members, contain strongly aromatic oils (think lavender, rosemary, basil, thyme, and sage), which account for their many uses as seasoning, flavoring, and perfuming agents.

There are many safe uses for mint-family herbs besides beautifying your gardens. Here is just a sampling:

Of course, mint isn’t only used to deter bugs; it also attracts the beneficial insects. Bees and butterflies and hover flies love mint, which is rich in nectar and pollen, and this benefits pollinated plants and crops.

Gabriel Hernández

23. Pharma Student and Kitchen Lover. Trying to bring the best of pop and indian culture to everyone.+ info

Related Articles

Más Noticias

Más Noticias